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ABOUT AIDS WATCH AFRICA

 

Created at the Abuja 2001 Special Summit, AIDS Watch Africa (AWA) is an entity of the African Union with the specific mandate to lead advocacy, accountability and resource mobilization efforts to advance a robust African response to end AIDS, TB and malaria by 2030. AIDS Watch Africa’s efforts are predicated on the Heads of State and Government’s (HoSG) successive political commitments to prioritise AIDS, TB and Malaria (Abuja Declarations) and the broader health and development agenda.

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VISION

 

MISSION

 

VALUE

 

STRUCTURE

 

COMMITMENTS FOR AIDS, TB AND MALARIA FOR AFRICA

 

 

DECLARATIONS

 

Information about major political declarations by African Heads of State and Government on AIDS, TB and Malaria since 2001.

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DECISIONS

 

Information about  major decisions on advocacy, resource mobilisation and  accountability by the AIDS Watch Africa Heads of State and Government and endorsed by the African Union Assembly of Heads of State and Government.

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AIDS WATCH AFRICA PROGRESS REPORTS

 

Key reports on the Annual AIDS Watch Africa Statutory Consultative Experts Meetings with key advocacy issues on AIDS, TB and Malaria and the broader health and development agenda for consideration by African Union Heads of State and Government.

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GLOBAL COMMITMENTS

 

Information about key United Nations Declarations on sustainable development and AIDS, TB and Malaria.

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FEATURED PUBLICATIONS

 

 

LATEST NEWS

 

 

08.12.2017  African Union and partners call for continued shared responsibility and global solidarity to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030
African Union and partners call for continued shared responsibility and global solidarity to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030
08.12.2017 African Union and partners call for accelerated efforts to close the tap on new HIV infections to end AIDS as a public health threat
African Union and partners call for accelerated efforts to close the tap on new HIV infections to end AIDS as a public health threat
01.12.2017 African Union Commission Chairperson’s statement  on the occasion of  World AIDS Day 2017
African Union Commission Chairperson’s statement on the occasion of World AIDS Day 2017
 African Union and partners call for continued shared responsibility and global solidarity to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030

 

African Union and partners call for continued shared responsibility and global solidarity to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030

 

Abidjan, 08 December 2017- The African Union and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria on Wednesday jointly organised a satellite symposium on domestic health financing. Despite significant progress in responding to the AIDS epidemic Africa confronts the world’s most acute public health threats that remain largely underfunded. After decades of underinvestment the continent need sustained investments in health in a context where international support has levelled due to many competing global priorities.

‘The Ebola crisis demonstrated that health systems on the continent are underfunded. The response highlighted the importance of regional and continental solidarity. While there are many competing priorities more investments are needed build resilience in our health and community systems’ said Dr. Goudou Coffie, the Minister of Health and Public Hygiene of Cote D’Ivoire.

Côte d’Ivoire announced a plan to invest CFA 21 billion in HIV programmes in the country between 2018 and 2020 to transform its health systems. With the West and Central Africa region lagging behind in its AIDS response, Heads of State and Government in July 2017 endorsed the Emergency Catch up Plan to accelerate the HIV response. The estimated cost for ending AIDS alone by 2030 is USD 36 billion a year, which is roughly twice the current levels of funding of USD 19 billion a year.

‘Given the strong economic growth on the continent, African leaders can make stronger commitments towards increasing national health budgets, and sustain and grow contributions to the national response. Recent reports indicate that lower- to middle-income countries have increased their health spending by 10% per year, much faster than the growth of Official Development Assistance for health’ said His Excellency, Ambassador John Simon, Vice-Chair of the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria.

The 2007 financial recession resulted in a paradigm shift in development cooperation as it hit African economies hard. While the world is just beginning to recover, there is need to recognise that the donor and Official Development Assistance environment has changed forever. A few figures can show this clearly. Official Development Assistance which in 1990 was USD 5.7 billion grew by 5 per cent per year between 1990 and 2000 and then increased by 11.3 per cent between 2000 and 2009 to USD 38 billion. However since 2009 this has levelled at 36 billion.  African countries now more than ever before need to leverage on Africa’s huge economic growth to fund its health programmes.

Since 2010, several African countries have increased their investments in the health sector. Uganda increased domestic investment 1.6-fold between 2011 and 2013 from US$ 40 million to US$ 105 million. Between 2012 and 2013, DRC and Ethiopia increased their domestic investment by more than 80%. In Swaziland, all public bodies are required to devote 2% of their budget to workplace policies for their staff. Malawi requires all ministries and departments to allocate a minimum of 2% recurrent costs budget to HIV-related activities. In 2011 Gabon increased investments in the National Fund for HIV Prevention and Treatment by approximately 150%.

‘Promoting accountability on continental and global commitments is a key priority of the African Union. It is in this context that Heads of State and Government endorsed the Africa Scorecard for Domestic Financing for Health in July 2016’, said Dr. Marie-Goretti-Harakeye, the Head of AIDS, TB, Malaria and Other Infectious Diseases at the African Union Commission who presented the scorecard at ICASA.

The Africa Scorecard for Domestic Financing for Health is a key tool for Member States in financial planning and expenditure tracking that will be released bi-annually. The African Union is working with WHO and partners to strengthen National Health Accounts.

For more information visit www.au.int  

For more information:

 

Tawanda Chisango | Advocacy and Partnerships Expert | Department of Social Affairs | African Union Commission I E-mail: chisangot@african-union.org I Tel: +251934167052

 

About the African Union

 

The African Union spearheads Africa’s development and integration in close collaboration with African Union Member States, the Regional Economic Communities and African citizens.  AU Vision: to accelerate progress towards an integrated, prosperous and inclusive Africa, at peace with itself, playing a dynamic role in the continental and global arena, effectively driven by an accountable, efficient and responsive Commission. Learn more at: http://www.au.int/en/

African Union and partners call for accelerated efforts to close the tap on new HIV infections to end AIDS as a public health threat

African Union and partners call for accelerated efforts to close the tap on new HIV infections to end AIDS as a public health threat

 

Call for evidence-informed, community-owned and rights based combination prevention

 

Abidjan, 08 December 2017- The African Union on Wednesday told participants at the ongoing International AIDS Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa that closing the tap of new HIV infections is the way to achieve the bold and ambitious targets set at the continental level. Africa led the HIV treatment access movement by putting 10.7 million people on treatment, contributing to the global targets to put 15 million people on treatment by 2015, achieved nine months ahead of schedule. The meeting urged Africa to similarly take a lead role in HIV prevention.

‘Building the momentum for HIV prevention is anchored on expanding both biomedical and proven primary prevention interventions. To be more effective HIV prevention packages should be evidence informed and meet local needs. Leaders and activists at various levels should continue to work together to catalyse change, stop new HIV infections and leave no one behind’, said Dr. Marie-Goretti Harakeye, the Head of AIDS, TB, Malaria and Other Infectious Diseases at the African Union Commission.

Prevention of HIV transmission continues to be affected by structural barriers such as poverty and other social factors that will need to be addressed broadly.

Prevention is a very cost-effective way to reduce disease burden. The Catalytic Framework to end AIDS, TB and Eliminate Malaria in Africa by 2030 seeks to reduce new HIV infections compared with 2015 to less than 375,000 per year by 2020.  

‘We have the science, innovation and tools for an HIV prevention movement. For greater impact and results we need to invest equally in prevention and treatment’ said Dr. Papa Salif Sow, Vice President for Africa, Gilead Sciences.

‘ While significant progress has been achieved in eliminating new HIV infections and keep mothers alive and healthy across Africa, only 5 countries on the continent have reached 95 per cent coverage. This calls for stepped up efforts to translate the existing political commitments into more sustained action in communities that are at great need of services’ said Chip Lyons, President and CEO of EGPAF.

During the meeting UNAIDS presented the recently adopted HIV Prevention 2020 Roadmap that contains a 10-point action plan that lays out immediate, concrete steps countries need to take to accelerate progress. Steps include conducting up-to-date analysis to assess where the opportunities are for maximum impact, developing guidance to identify gaps and actions for rapid scale-up, training to develop expertise in HIV prevention and on developing networks and addressing legal and policy barriers to reach the people most affected by HIV.

The roadmap pushes for strengthened action around five combination prevention  pillars, adolescent girls, young women and their male partners in high-prevalence locations; prevention programmes for key populations; strengthened national condom and related behavioural change programmes; voluntary medical male circumcision in high prevalence countries and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to population at greater risk.

For more information visit www.au.int  

For more information:

 

Tawanda Chisango | Advocacy and Partnerships Expert | Department of Social Affairs | African Union Commission I E-mail: chisangot@african-union.org I Tel: +251934167052

 

About the African Union

 

The African Union spearheads Africa’s development and integration in close collaboration with African Union Member States, the Regional Economic Communities and African citizens.  AU Vision: to accelerate progress towards an integrated, prosperous and inclusive Africa, at peace with itself, playing a dynamic role in the continental and global arena, effectively driven by an accountable, efficient and responsive Commission. Learn more at: http://www.au.int/en/

African Union Commission Chairperson’s statement  on the occasion of  World AIDS Day 2017

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Today, 01 December 2017, the African Union joins the international community to commemorate the World AIDS Day. This Day provides us with an opportunity to reflect on the progress, challenges and opportunities in our fight against this terrible pandemic.

 This year’s Theme “My Health, My Right” reminds us that access to quality universal health care is not a luxury but a fundamental human right. And it is our collective duty to ensure that all citizens on the Continent lead healthy and fulfilling lives as enshrined in Agenda 2063, Africa’s development blueprint.

 As we commemorate this year’s World AIDS Day, it is encouraging to note that African countries have made significant strides in responding to this pandemic. Africa has met its AIDS targets set for 2015, while continuing to struggle for better results.

 Today in Africa, 12 million people have access to adequate treatment and 1.2 million new HIV infections among children have been averted since 2009. This was due to high level political commitment, scientific breakthroughs and unprecedented partnerships never seen before in the history of global health.

 Despite the recorded success, HIV still remains a huge threat for the continent’s broader health and development agenda. AIDS-related deaths are still very high, new HIV infections are not declining fast enough, the disease is having a disproportionate impact on young people, women and girls, stigma and discrimination still persists, health systems remain weak and resources are not adequate.

 Our Continent accounts for approximately two thirds of the global total of new HIV infections with major disparities between regions. It is in this context that in July 2017, AU Heads of State and Government endorsed the Emergency Catch up Plan to accelerate the HIV response in the regions that are lagging behind.

 For us to successfully realize the Aspirations of Agenda 2063, children in Africa must be born and stay HIV-free. We have to sustain the political commitment, increase domestic financing and continue to forge ahead with shared responsibility and global solidarity.

 For the socio-economic transformation of Africa, it is imperative that its most precious resource, the youth, remains on the continent. For that, it is our duty to do all it takes to empower them and to make sure that their most fundamental rights to education, health, skills and employment are met.

 Let us rally together, all stakeholders within the Continent, in the strive towards achieving by 2030, an Africa where all citizens have access to their fundamental right: a healthy and productive life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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